THE TRUTH ABOUT CREATINE WATER WEIGHT

One of the primary concerns of those considering creatine use is the issue of creatine water weight gain.

They’ve heard that creatine can offer some powerful muscle building benefits to those who use it, but have also heard that you can start to experience a noticeable amount of water retention as well.

Since they want to maintain the leanest body possible as they go about their muscle building program, this can cause second thoughts about whether or not they should use creatine at all.

Let’s go over what you need to know about creatine water weight gain…


Where The Water Is Gained

Yes, it’s true that creatine will cause the body to store more water, however, this water is stored inside of the muscle cell and not directly under the skin like many people believe.

When water is stored under the skin, that’s when you’ll get that bloated and puffy appearance that most people are trying to avoid.

When water is stored in the muscle cell, that’s when you’ll end up looking leaner, vascular, and more defined.


How This Myth Got Started

So how did the “creatine water weight gain” myth get started?

It most likely started because the people who were using creatine were also following a higher calorie diet for muscle building purposes. As a result, their overall carbohydrate and sodium intake was increased as well.

An increased intake of carbohydrates in the diet will definitely lead to greater water storage under the skin, resulting in that soft and puffy appearance.

If you’ve ever done a lower carb diet, had a high carb day, and then seen your weight shoot right up afterwards, you know very well how a high carb day can impact you.

This same principle applies. When you move from a moderate carb diet to a very high carb one, you will get extra water retention under the skin, which makes you look far ‘fatter’ than you really are.

So don’t be misled into thinking that creatine water weight is what is making you look less defined. If anything, creatine will help you look more defined.

It’s the changes you might be making to your diet that will cause the problem.

Control your diet better and you can offset these effects easily.

– Sean

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